Asset Allocation

An asset allocation strategy diversifies investments across different asset classes and global markets with the goal of improving the balance of reward and risk.

Putnam offers three broadly diversified asset allocations funds

The three funds provide a choice to puruse the financial goals of different types of investors.

Consider these risks before investing: International investing involves currency, economic, and political risks. Emerging-market securities have illiquidity and volatility risks. Investments in small and/or midsize companies increase the risk of greater price fluctuations. Lower-rated bonds may offer higher yields in return for more risk. Funds that invest in government securities are not guaranteed. Mortgage-backed securities are subject to prepayment risk and the risk that they may increase in value less when interest rates decline and decline in value more when interest rates rise. Our allocation of assets among permitted asset categories may hurt performance. Growth stocks may be more susceptible to earnings disappointments, and value stocks may fail to rebound. Bond investments are subject to interest-rate risk (the risk of bond prices falling if interest rates rise) and credit risk (the risk of an issuer defaulting on interest or principal payments). Interest-rate risk is greater for longer-term bonds, and credit risk is greater for below-investment-grade bonds. Risks associated with derivatives include increased investment exposure (which may be considered leverage) and, in the case of over-the-counter instruments, the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions and the potential failure of the other party to the instrument to meet its obligations. Unlike bonds, funds that invest in bonds have fees and expenses. Stock and bond prices may fall or fail to rise over time for several reasons, including general financial market conditions and factors related to a specific issuer or industry. You can lose money by investing in the fund.