The math of market risk

Up and down markets are not symmetrical: After a market drawdown, it takes a larger upswing to get back on track.

Seek to reduce risk with absolute return and low volatility strategies.

Absolute return strategies can perform independently of market direction.

Average returns on the 25 worst days for the S&P 500 Index since fund inception (12/23/08–6/30/16)

Low beta strategies favor stocks that are less volatile than the market average.

Average returns on the 25 worst days for the S&P 500 Index since fund inception (10/18/13–6/30/16)

Current performance may be lower or higher than the quoted past performance, which cannot guarantee future results. Share price, principal value, and return will vary, and you may have a gain or a loss when you sell your shares. Performance assumes reinvestment of distributions and does not account for taxes. For the most recent month-end performance, please visit putnam.com. Class Y shares before their inception are derived from the historical performance of class A shares, which have not been adjusted for the lower expenses; had they, returns would have been higher. For a portion of the periods, this fund may have had expense limitations, without which returns would have been lower. Class Y shares are generally only available for corporate and institutional clients and have no initial sales charge.

For complete performance, please click the links above.

* Consider these risks before investing: Allocation of assets among asset classes may hurt performance. Bond prices may fall or fail to rise over time for several reasons, including general financial market conditions, changing market perceptions of the risk of default, changes in government intervention, and factors related to a specific issuer or industry. These factors may also lead to periods of high volatility and reduced liquidity in the bond markets. Growth stocks may be more susceptible to earnings disappointments, and value stocks may fail to rebound. Bond investments are subject to interest-rate risk (the risk of bond prices falling if interest rates rise) and credit risk (the risk of an issuer defaulting on interest or principal payments). Interest-rate risk is greater for longer-term bonds, and credit risk is greater for below-investment-grade bonds. Unlike bonds, funds that invest in bonds have fees and expenses. Lower-rated bonds may offer higher yields in return for more risk. Funds that invest in government securities are not guaranteed. Mortgage-backed securities are subject to prepayment risk and the risk that they may increase in value less when interest rates decline and decline in value more when interest rates rise. International investing involves currency, economic, and political risks. Emerging-market securities have illiquidity and volatility risks. Our alpha strategy may lose money or not earn a return sufficient to cover associated trading and other costs. Our use of leverage obtained through derivatives increases these risks by increasing investment exposure. Risks associated with derivatives include increased investment exposure (which may be considered leverage) and, in the case of over-the-counter instruments, the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions and the potential failure of the other party to the instrument to meet its obligations. The fund's efforts to produce lower-volatility returns may not be successful and may make it more difficult at times for the fund to achieve its targeted return. Under certain market conditions, the fund may accept greater-than-typical volatility to seek its targeted return. The fund may not achieve its goal, and it is not intended to be a complete investment program. You can lose money by investing in the fund. The fund's prospectus lists additional risks.

** Risks associated with derivatives include increased investment exposure (which may be considered leverage) and, in the case of over-the-counter instruments, the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions and the potential failure of the other party to the instrument to meet its obligations. Stock prices may fall or fail to rise over time for several reasons, including general financial market conditions and factors related to a specific company or industry. There may be times when stocks in the fund's portfolio exhibit higher volatility than we expect, are not correlated with market movements as we expect, or underperform the markets. By selling covered call options, the fund limits its opportunity to profit from an increase in the price of the underlying portfolio securities, but continues to bear the risk of a decline in the value of these securities. The fund also risks losing all or part of the cash paid for purchasing put options. You can lose money by investing in the fund.